Dreamers Share Their Stories on Interactive Platform

"The U.S. is my home, but I still hold resentment this country because they don’t accept me,” said Anayeli Gomez, 22. (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us).

“The U.S. is my home, but I still hold resentment to this country because they don’t accept me,” said Anayeli Gomez, 22. (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us).

An interactive multimedia project in support of the DREAM Act is encouraging dreamers across the nation to put out their pictures and share their aspirations.

The website “Somos Dreamers/We Are Dreamers” has been launched by ImpreMedia, the publisher of El Diario-La Prensa and Los Angeles’ La Opinión, and features pictures and stories in English and Spanish of many New Yorkers.

According to the website:

Alfredo Gálvez, 23 (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us).

Alfredo Gálvez, 23 (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us)

“We Are Dreamers” is a national photographic project created by impreMedia Content Labs that puts a face and a voice to one of the most present groups that are being affected by the discussion of  Immigration Reform, and in general public debates.

Through a photo and a small text, we aim to focus on demonstrating who these young adults are and what the United States means to them.

(…) The Dreamers are teenagers and young adults who find themselves in the United States and lack status. The majority of them arrived in the United States with their parents or family members at a very young age, in search of new horizons and opportunities. Today, their ages fluctuate between 15 and 31 years old, and all with one voice, stronger than ever, state: “We are Dreamers and this country is our home.”

Jazmín Cruz, 18 (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us).

Jazmín Cruz, 18 (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us)

According to the website, there are some 2.1 million dreamers in the U.S. One million of them will be able to benefit from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program ordered last year by President Obama, “which means that they will not be deported and may have a work permit for two years, with possibility of renewal.”

The congressional bill “DREAM Act” would result in the possibility of acquiring a temporary residency as a first step in obtaining U.S. citizenship.

A dozen New Yorkers from 12 to 27 years old have submitted their faces and stories to the website.

Carlos Jara, 27 (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us).

Carlos Jara, 27 (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us)

Among them is Jazmín Cruz, 18, a student who considers the U.S. “before anything, my home. I grew up here and it is all that I know. I arrived here at 6 years old, and at times it is hard, fighting so much and not being able to receive anything. That’s what I would like to change.”

“The United States is my home, but I still hold resentment to this country because they don’t accept me,” said Anayeli Gomez, 22. “I arrived here when I was 3 years old and to this day I cannot leave. I feel trapped here, I want to explore, see my people, my country in Mexico, but I can’t and it frustrates me.”

Katerin Pleites, 12 (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us).

Katerin Pleites, 12 (Photo by Gerardo Romo via somosdreamers.us).

Many students, among them Elizabeth Lucero, 18, and Marlene Peralta, 25, praise the opportunities offered by this country, which designer Carlos Jara, 27, sees as “the place where I believe everything is possible.”

For Alfredo Gálvez, 23, the U.S. “is the place that gives me a lot, but at the same time, it doesn’t allow me to have, for example, my family and customs.”

“My dream is to become a teacher and I am doing everything to achieve that,” said Katerin Pleites, 12.

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