A ‘Win’ for the Ayotzinapa 43 at the NYC Marathon

Antonio Tizapa runs with a photo of his son, one of the disappeared Ayotzinapa 43, in the New York City Marathon Nov. 1 (Photo by Gustavo Martínez Contreras for Voices of NY)

Antonio Tizapa runs with a photo of his son, one of the disappeared Ayotzinapa 43, in the New York City Marathon Nov. 1 (Photo by Gustavo Martínez Contreras for Voices of NY)

Antonio Tizapa felt his legs could not take another step when he was just a few yards away from the New York City Marathon finishing line, but then he saw the photo of his son in the crowd.

“I was running very slowly because I had no strength and just then I saw his image; my brother was holding it and he hadn’t seen me. I approached and took it from him,” Tizapa said. “It was wonderful, being able to finish the race with him, with the support of the people, and that made me run faster in those last meters.”

Tizapa, 48, and about a dozen other runners in Sunday’s race were the foot soldiers for a local campaign to extend to the world of sports the call for justice for the 43 Ayotzinapa students forcibly disappeared in México on Sept. 26, 2014.

His son, Jorge Antonio Tizapa Legideño, is among those still missing. And to drill the message even deeper, for the marathon he wore a shirt with a big number 43 along with the message: My son is your son, and your son is my son.

“We wanted to send a message to the Mexican government that Mexican athletes abroad are aware of what’s happening in Mexico. And I believe that what we did here today will impact positively the fight of all the (Ayotzinapa) parents and it will also impact negatively the Mexican government and all the lies they have been saying all along,” Tizapa said.

The group had organized to have people hold the photos of every one of the 43 students at each kilometer of the race. Given that a marathon consists of 42 kilometers, they titled their action “42 for 43”.

The images with the faces of many of the students were visible at various points of the race, but Tizapa said there was no tally of how many people participated. Still, it felt like a victory in the uphill battle he has been fighting since his son and his classmates went missing.

“At least now the world knows we were here. That satisfies me greatly. Because people screamed their support from the crowd, and some took videos and photos. So, all of this information is being disseminated and it’s reaching all levels. And that’s the most important thing. We don’t have anything more to do than to keep spreading this message and demanding for the safe return of our kids,” he said.

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