History

Posthumous mural of Jean-Jacques Dessalines (Creative Commons license)

A Controversial Street Co-Naming in Little Haiti?

Brooklyn, Caribbean, History August 9, 2018 at 6:00 pm

A street in Little Haiti is being co-named after Jean-Jacques Dessalines, the first leader of Haiti after independence. Brooklyn Daily Eagle takes a look at why some hesitate to celebrate the ruler.

Catacombs underneath Old St. Patrick’s in Little Italy (Photo by David Bergman via Bowery Boogie)

Irish History and Catacombs in Little Italy

History, Manhattan, Western European July 16, 2018 at 5:14 pm

Join Bowery Boogie on a tour of the only catacombs found in Manhattan.

Zuni dough bowl, circa 1880, by We'wha (1849-1896). (All photos by Sean Parrish for Voices of NY)

‘Two-Spirit’ Art in NYC

Culture, Featured Posts, History, Native American July 3, 2018 at 2:51 pm

A new exhibit of both contemporary and deceased Native American artists explores the Two-Spirit tradition.

A protest in Upper Manahttan. (Photo by Humberto Arellano)

Columbia University Opens El Diario’s Photo Archives to the Public

History, Latino, Media, New York June 27, 2018 at 4:54 pm

El Diario/La Prensa, in collaboration with Columbia University, has put at the public’s disposal a collection of 5,000 photographs capturing the moments and personalities that have defined the Latino experience in the city since 1970.

(Photo via East Harlem Preservation)

Where Sims Statue Stood, Time to Honor a Black or Latina Medical Pioneer

African American, Black, Health, History, Manhattan June 14, 2018 at 5:32 pm

Which “monumental woman” should be honored?

A Baptism of Fire: La Prensa’s Launch as a Daily

A Baptism of Fire: La Prensa’s Launch as a Daily

Featured Posts, History, Latino, Media, New York June 4, 2018 at 5:54 pm

World War I brought about the first major act of solidarity of the New York Hispanic community and the nation’s oldest Spanish-language newspaper.

Bautismo de fuego: El lanzamiento de La Prensa como diario en 1918

Bautismo de fuego: El lanzamiento de La Prensa como diario en 1918

History, Latino, Media, New York June 4, 2018 at 5:53 pm

La primera guerra mundial dio lugar al primer gran acto de solidaridad de la comunidad hispana en Nueva York y al diario en español más antiguo de Estados Unidos.

Photographers Andrew Kung (left) and Emanuel Hahn at their Pearl River Mart exhibition, "The Mississippi Delta Chinese." (Photo by Chunxiang Jin via World Journal)

Lives of ‘Mississippi Delta Chinese’ Documented in Photos

Culture, East Asian, History May 25, 2018 at 12:15 pm

A photo exhibition on the little-known community of Chinese in the Mississippi Delta is on display at the Pearl River Mart. The two New York-based photographers speak to World Journal.

The first issue of France-Amérique, published on May 23, 1943

France-Amérique Marks 75 Years

History, Media, New York, Western European May 23, 2018 at 3:48 pm

France-Amérique writes about its first issue, published on May 23, 1943.

‘Whose War on Drugs’ #BHeard Town Hall Planned

‘Whose War on Drugs’ #BHeard Town Hall Planned

Brooklyn, Criminal Justice, Health, History, New York, Politics May 22, 2018 at 2:50 pm

“Whose War on Drugs?” – a #BHeard Town Hall – will be held May 23 in Brooklyn.

At the New York State Capitol, State Sen. Kathleen A. Marchione and Dr. Andrij Baran hold the resolution marking the 85th anniversary of the Holodomor, which was passed in the State Senate on May 1. Witnessing the historic event are members of the Capital District’s Ukrainian American community. (Photo via The Ukrainian Weekly)

Marking the 85th Anniversary of Ukraine’s Famine-Genocide

Eastern European, History, New York May 15, 2018 at 3:01 pm

The Ukrainian Weekly reports on a resolution recently passed by the New York State Senate commemorating the 85th anniversary of the Holodomor.

An ‘Unlikely Activist’ in Chinatown

An ‘Unlikely Activist’ in Chinatown

Asian, History, Women May 3, 2018 at 3:50 pm

The May episode of CUNY TV’s “Asian American Life” highlights women activists and philanthropists, including an “unlikely” suffragette in Chinatown who may soon be recognized at the federal level.

Liang Jin shows a photo of his father's family in China. (Photo by Yu Lan via World Journal)

Chinese Share Memories of Exclusion Act

East Asian, History, Immigration April 25, 2018 at 3:25 pm

At the annual Family Treasures event at the Museum of Chinese in America, Chinese Americans brought historical documents and photos belonging to family members who lived during the era of the Chinese Exclusion Act, reports World Journal.

Legacy preserved: Local civic gurus voted to co-name Gold Street between Myrtle Avenue and Willoughby Street after journalist and civil-rights advocate Ida B. Wells, who lived on the block back in the 1890s.

‘Ida B. Wells Place’ in Brooklyn?

African American, Brooklyn, History, Women April 23, 2018 at 5:06 pm

A part of Gold Street in downtown Brooklyn could be named in honor of Ida B. Wells, the journalist and abolitionist who spent her formative years in the borough, writes Brooklyn Paper.

Old and new: A walking tour of Coney Island on April 21 will educate people about businesses that were started by immigrants, including Nathan’s Famous Frankfurters. (Photo from the Coney Island History Project via Brooklyn Paper)

The Immigrants Behind Coney Island’s Iconic Businesses

Business, History, Immigration April 20, 2018 at 1:29 pm

The “Immigrant Heritage Tour of Coney Island,” taking place on April 21, will inform visitors about the famous businesses in the area founded by immigrants, reports Brooklyn Paper.