Top 20 Stories of 2013

Did Pakistanis Vote for a Tiger or a Lion?

Did Pakistanis Vote for a Tiger or a Lion?

When supporters of Pakistan’s prime minister-elect Mian Nawaz Sharif stamped their approval on his PML-N party’s election symbol of a tiger, were they really voting for a lion? Newspaper editors, party supporters and members of the New York Pakistani community are not really sure.

Photo by Skyler Reid

Special Report: Employers Turn Their Backs on Undocumented Workers Injured on the Job

In N.Y. and 27 other states, undocumented workers are entitled to workers’ compensation but many immigrants are unaware of these protections and are reluctant to confront their employers when they are injured on the job. They fear their bosses will fire them or worse, rat them out to immigration authorities.

‘Almost Like India, Minus the Animals’

‘Almost Like India, Minus the Animals’

Follow Little India’s Rachel Khona on a trip through the Indian enclave of Jackson Heights, Queens. Walk through supermarkets, sari shops, and jewelry stores, and take a seat at Jackson Diner.

Special Report: Immigrants Increase Clout, Elect Reps Back Home

Special Report: Immigrants Increase Clout, Elect Reps Back Home

Local elections to choose a representative in a faraway legislature are becoming increasingly common and New York City, with its large, vibrant ethnic enclaves, plays a visible and important role. For example, Ecuadorean New Yorkers Ximena Peña and Alex Guamán were elected last month for a seat in the National Assembly back home.

City Shortchanges Community & Ethnic Press in Ad $

City Shortchanges Community & Ethnic Press in Ad $

The combined circulation of community and ethnic publications in the city is about 4.5 million, equal to 55% of the population, but they receive only about 18% of the roughly $18 million the city spends in ads a year, a new report finds.

In Astoria, A Spot Where Food and World Peace Mix

In Astoria, A Spot Where Food and World Peace Mix

Ali El Sayed is an artist. His canvas is a plate and his brush ranges from an eggplant to a beef shank. The Egypt-born chef has owned Kabab Café for over 25 years and believes that food, not diplomacy, is the key to attaining world peace.