Post Tagged with: "Hue-Man"

(Photo from Dominion of New York)

Closed Hue-Man Bookstore Reemerges

African American, Business, Culture October 16, 2012 at 4:46 pm

When Hue-Man, a bookstore that catered to a Black audience, shut its doors in the summer, its CEO said it would change its business model. Within a few months, the store has hosted pop-up events and gone online.

a new set of proposed City Council District maps would seek to consolidate the political power of northern Manhattan. (Image via Manhattan Times)

Voices in Focus: A Plan to Merge Political Power in Upper Manhattan

Business, Culture September 13, 2012 at 5:30 pm

From Northern Manhattan updates on redistricting maps and the Word Up bookstore and in Bed-Stuy, a resurgence of the Jewish population, which started leaving in droves in the late 1950s.

Writer and Pulitzer Prize winner for Fiction Junot Díaz speaks at Word Up on June 7, 2012. (Photo by Paul Lomax/DNAinfo)

A Tale of Two Independent Bookstores

African American, Business, Culture July 17, 2012 at 3:51 pm

One independent bookstore, Word Up, struggles to stay alive, as another, Hue-Man, closes its doors after 10 years, the Manhattan Times reports. Meanwhile, Amsterdam News highlights other bookstores focused on black culture citywide.

Dr. Elnora Calimlim and Dr. Jefferson Calimlim in a November 2006 photo at the U.S. District Court in Milwaukee.  (Via jsonline.com)

Voices in Focus: A Pair of Former Doctors Deported for Slavery

Crime, Education July 3, 2012 at 4:49 pm

Today we have news of a debate over equity in New York City schools; a call for adoption within the African-American community; plans for Salvadorean expatriates to vote in their country’s 2014 presidential elections; more from a controversial study about Asian-Americans; deported slave-holders; and sad news about two independent bookstores.

(Photo from Dominion of New York)

Promoting Books and Culture, Bookstore or No Bookstore

Culture April 24, 2012 at 1:10 pm

We came across two stories of independent bookstores last week — one that’s thriving in Harlem, and one that closed its doors in the Bronx. But in both situations, the owners’ commitment to spreading a love of reading is steadfast.