Post Tagged with: "split families"

(Photo by Peter Moskowitz)

Some Korean ‘Parachute Children,’ Face Abuse at Homestays

East Asian, Education September 10, 2012 at 4:03 pm

After Voices of NY’s special project on Korean “parachute children,” The Korea Times has continued to report on the practice of “chogi yuhak,” or “early study abroad” for Korean students — including the physical and sexual abuse that some visiting students face in their homestays, and the complaints of host families about their visitors’ misbehavior.

Voices of immigrant women at Occupy Wall Street, New York City. Photo via Womens eNews by matti keltanen/ keltanen on Flickr, under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC 2.0). -- Via

Opinion: What About the Human Rights of Undocumented Mothers?

Immigration, Opinion July 27, 2012 at 5:02 pm

Harsh anti-immigrant laws in Alabama, Arizona and other states are wreaking havoc on the lives of immigrant women, writes Mallika Dutt, president of the global human rights organization Breakthrough, in an column for Women’s eNews.

Photo by Peter Moskowitz

Studying and Struggling, 7,000 Miles From Home

Education, Featured Posts, Parachute Children July 11, 2012 at 12:50 pm

Thousands of Korean children and teens travel to North America to study without their parents, a practice known as “chogi yuhak.” They hope to learn English, and to get a leg up in college admissions.

Hyuk ‘Jim’ Jee: ‘People Tell Me I’m Crazily Friendly’

Hyuk ‘Jim’ Jee: ‘People Tell Me I’m Crazily Friendly’

Parachute Children July 11, 2012 at 12:50 pm

Hyuk “Jim” Jee, 17, struggled to communicate and make friends when he first arrived as an 10th grader to North Babylon, on Long Island. In Korea, he said, “I didn’t really know how to socialize outside of academics,” but after a year here, he has become a “social person.”

Alex Yoo: ‘I’m Afraid My Younger Sister Will Forget My Face’

Alex Yoo: ‘I’m Afraid My Younger Sister Will Forget My Face’

Parachute Children July 11, 2012 at 12:49 pm

Alex Yoo, a 14-year-old studying in New Jersey, appreciates the opportunities he has in America to play sports, rather than spend all his time studying. But he misses his family in Korea, and sometimes wishes he could go home.

Jiha Ham: ‘No One Else in My High School was From Korea’

Jiha Ham: ‘No One Else in My High School was From Korea’

Parachute Children July 11, 2012 at 12:49 pm

After studying in Canada in his teens, Jiha Ham, 30, a reporter for the Korea Times in New York City, wrote a guide to the Korean practice of chogi yuhak, or early study abroad. “It’s a controversial issue,” he concedes — but for Ham the experience helped him find his path to journalism.